Liberal Democracy’s Crisis of Confidence

Article
October 2018

Public-opinion data from Pew Research Center show that global support for representative democracy is widespread, but often thin. Amid rising economic anxiety, cultural unease, and political frustration, citizens are increasingly open to alternative systems of government.

Latin America’s Shifting Politics: Democratic Survival and Weakness

Article
October 2018

Democracy is enduring in Latin America, but it cannot be said to be prospering. Illiberalism and polarization are rising. Yet core democratic institutions remain firmly in place, and therein lies hope.

Dashed Hopes and Extremism in Tunisia

Article
January 2018

Tunisia is now one of the Arab world’s most democratic countries, but it has also been producing worrisome numbers of recruits for groups such as ISIS. How can this paradox be explained? 

Eroding Norms and Democratic Deconsolidation

Article
October 2017

“Democratic deconsolidation” on the level of attitudes and beliefs is real, and behind it lies a disturbing rise in tolerance for antisocial behavior, especially among the young. 

The 2016 U.S. Election: How Trump Lost and Won

Article
April 2017

Three factors help to explain the historically wide split between the electoral and popular vote counts: economic and political fundamentals, polarization among voters over identity issues, and the sharply divergent ways in which the candidates chose to address these issues.

Britain After Brexit: A Transformed Political Landscape

Article
January 2017

The British party system is being fundamentally reshaped by the consequences of the British decision to leave the EU, which also threatens to reduce Britain’s influence on the rest of the world.

Britain After Brexit: The Risk to Northern Ireland

Article
January 2017

The British decision to leave the EU raises difficult challenges for the still-delicate settlement upon which peace and stability in Northern Ireland depend.

The Signs of Deconsolidation

Article
January 2017

Political scientists have long assumed that “democratic consolidation” is a one-way street, but survey evidence of declining support for democracy from across the established democracies suggests that deconsolidation is a genuine danger.

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