Democratization and Authoritarianism in the Arab World

Book

The uprisings that swept the Arab world beginning in 2010 toppled four entrenched rulers and seemed to create a political opening in a region long impervious to democratization.

Review Essay: Why Tunisia?

Article
October 2018

A review of Tunisia: An Arab Anomaly by Safwan M. Masri.

Dashed Hopes and Extremism in Tunisia

Article
January 2018

Tunisia is now one of the Arab world’s most democratic countries, but it has also been producing worrisome numbers of recruits for groups such as ISIS. How can this paradox be explained? 

Jordan and Morocco: The Palace Gambit

Article
April 2017

Two of the Arab world’s more liberal regimes, the kingdoms of Jordan and Morocco, are sometimes said to be evolving toward democracy. Is this true, and what are the longer-term prospects for these two monarchies?

The Quest for Good Governance: Georgia’s Break with the Past

Article
January 2016

Much can be done to uproot graft when a major event such as the Rose Revolution sweeps in a determined new team on a wave of massive public support.

After the Arab Spring: How the Media Trashed the Transitions

Article
October 2015

The Arab experience shows that the same media that facilitate the toppling of dictators can make it harder to build democracy.

After the Arab Spring: Are Secular Parties the Answer?

Article
October 2015

A close look at secular parties in the Middle East today raises doubts about whether they are ready for prime time.

After the Arab Spring: The Islamists’ Compromise in Tunisia

Article
October 2015

How did a potent Islamist movement come to accept a non-Islamist constitution? The answer lies in that movement’s self-protective reflexes.

After the Arab Spring: Do Muslims Vote Islamic Now?

Article
October 2015

Islamic political parties were not especially popular with voters in Muslim-majority countries before the Arab Spring. Has that changed?

After the Arab Spring: People Still Want Democracy

Article
October 2015

Data from the Arab Barometer suggest that Arabs have not rejected democracy. In fact, they still by and large believe in it and want it.

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