October 2020, Volume 31, Issue 4

How Authoritarians Use International Law

  • Tom Ginsburg
Through greater savvy engagement with international law, authoritarians are seeking not only to shield themselves from criticism, but to reshape global norms in their favor.

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October 2020, Volume 31, Issue 4

The Authoritarian Assault on Knowledge

Universities, publishers, and other knowledge-sector institutions face increasingly sophisticated authoritarian efforts to quash critics and subvert independent inquiry.

October 2020, Volume 31, Issue 4

China’s Message Machine

The People’s Republic of China uses massive amounts of propaganda to influence how it is perceived beyond its borders. “Big data” reveal how that image is carefully and deliberately shaped for different audiences in different places.

Featured News

A Conversation on Competitive Authoritarianism

Journal of Democracy editorial board co-chairs Lucan Way and Steven Levitsky sat down with the Journal‘s Brent Kallmer to discuss the new competitive authoritarianism that has emerged in some countries with relatively strong democratic traditions and institutions.

 

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30 Years of World Politics: What Has Changed?

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On Democratic Backsliding

Old-fashioned military coups and blatant election-day fraud are becoming mercifully rarer these days, but other, subtler forms of democratic regression are a growing problem that demands more attention.

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Polarization versus Democracy

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Why National Identity Matters

From enhancing physical security to encouraging mutual trust, an inclusive sense of national identity continues to be crucial to the flourishing of modern states.

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Illiberal Democracy and the Struggle on the Right

At present, the key struggle for the future of liberal democracy appears as if it will be unfolding among parties and thinkers on the right.