Hong Kong's Democrats Hold Their Own

Article
January 2009

A decade after the handover of their city to China, Hong Kong’s “pandemocrats” remain able to stand their ground at the ballot box.

Debating the Color Revolutions: A Reply to My Critics

Article
January 2009

The color revolutions illustrate both the prevalence of diffusion and the potential limits of its impact on political change.

Debating the Color Revolutions: What Are We Trying to Explain?

Article
January 2009

Change may be caused more by the frailty of the regime than the strength of the opposition, but in such cases the outcome is often less democratic.

Poverty, Inequality, and Democracy: Why Democracies Fail

Article
October 2008

Many of today’s developing-world and postcommunist democracies are at risk of reversal. What are the key factors that lead to democratic collapse?

Pakistan After Musharraf: The Media Take Center Stage

Article
October 2008

The military regime opened up the media sector to more competition and private broadcasters in 2002, and the ramifications turned out to be vast.

Books in Review: Asia's Progress

Article
July 2008

A review of Pacific Asia in Quest of Democracy by Roland Rich.

The Crisis in Kenya

Article
July 2008

For years Kenya was regarded as one of Africa’s sturdiest democracies. The fraudulent 2007 presidential election, however, exposed the fragility of Kenya’s democratic framework.

A New Look at Ethnicity and Democratization

Article
July 2008

Conventional scholarly wisdom holds that ethnic diversity within a given society generally dims democracy’s prospects. Careful reflection on the experience of many post-Soviet states, however, suggests that this need not be so.

The Orange Revolution and Beyond

Article
July 2008

Ukraine gained independence in 1991, but its people gained their freedom only in 2004 with the Orange Revolution—an uprising of the human spirit in which Ukrainians joined together to gain a voice in their future.

The Remarkable Story of Somaliland

Article
July 2008

Emerging from one of the world’s most notorious failed states, Somaliland has become an oasis of relative democratic stability in the troubled Horn of Africa. What does its story teach us about democratic state-building?

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